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  1. Praise was also given to each supporting musician—guitarist Allan Holdsworth, keyboardist Jim Cox and bassist Jimmy Johnson—for their "top-notch performances". [1] Track listing [ edit ]

  2. 25 de ene. de 2017 · Forty Reasons - YouTube. Chad Wackerman - Topic. 798 subscribers. 83. 3.7K views 6 years ago. Provided to YouTube by The Orchard Enterprises Forty Reasons · Allan Holdsworth · Chad...

  3. "Forty Reasons" is a 1991 album by Chad Wackerman. This album features Allan, Chad and Jimmy Johnson, as well as keyboardist Jim Cox. Around half the tunes are Chad compositions, and they are for the most part energetic fusion, as exemplified by the groovy opener “Holiday Insane” and “Tell Me”, which Allan would perform with his own band.

  4. Holdsworth colaboró en álbumes de diversos estilos, que van desde el jazz tradicional, el free jazz, el acid jazz, la música electrónica y hasta el metal progresivo. 4 . Holdsworth falleció el 15 de abril de 2017. 1 Su cuerpo fue encontrado al día siguiente en su casa de Vista, California. En un principio, no se dio a conocer la causa de ...

  5. Holdsworth would also play on Chad Wackerman's first two studio albums, Forty Reasons (1991) and The View (1993). [36] Holdsworth's first solo album of the decade was 1992's Wardenclyffe Tower , which continued to feature the SynthAxe but also displayed his newfound interest in self-designed baritone guitars built by luthier Bill ...

  6. 6 de sept. de 2015 · Wackerman's choice in sidemen gives FORTY REASONS drop kick, punch, and top-notch performances by an airtight band. "Forty Reasons" was drummer Chad Wackerman's debut solo project from 1991 and featured luminaries such as Allan Holdsworth on guitar, Jimmy Johnson on bass and Jim Cox on keyboards.

  7. 31 de may. de 2022 · JJ 05/92: Allan Holdsworth – the reluctant guitarist in conversation with Mark Gilbert. Touching on childhood, early technique, non-chromaticism, string gauges, necks, avoiding open position and wishing he could hang about. First published in Jazz Journal May 1992